How our talented team won $2500 at the TechCrunch Disrupt NYC Hackathon

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We had an absolutely amazing and talented team at the TechCrunch Disrupt NYC 2014 Hackathon! Shout outs to our awesome front end designers Amanda Gobaud and Michelle Lee, and our tireless devs, Amine Tourki, Andrew Furman, and Teddy Ku. Here are the lessons that I learned from building a web application that won the $2500 Concur Technologies API first place prize.

  • Our app, CorpSquare (Concur + Foursquare), solved a problem. Several of the team members (me included) used Concur in the companies we worked for. So we had experience with problems or cool and practical use cases that an app designed around the Concur API could do. Even the  Concur VP of Platform Marketing told us afterwards that he had seen many with the problem we were trying to solve.
  • But, we also played the game strategically. Concur is a business expense tracking platform; most of their clients are big businesses. We felt that a business expense API wouldn’t seem as “exciting” or “sexy” as some of the other consumer-facing start-up APIs (Evernote, Weather Underground, to name a few). Since the different companies who sponsored the hackathon had API specific rewards for teams that used their API in the coolest way, this implied that there might be less competition for the Concur API reward. We made a “value” bet of sorts, as value investors would say–the strategy seems to have paid off.
  • Our team’s skills were complementarybut not too much so. A good hackathon team probably needs both design and dev skills, and different people should specialize in one or the other to make things most efficient. But, everyone should be well versed enough in non-specialty skills (like designers in dev, devs in design) to be able to communicate efficiently. For example, our designers were comfortable with both UI/UX design as well front end development like CSS. Several of our developers were full-stack, implementing the back end but also helping out with the front end. We used technologies (frameworks, languages) that we were all comfortable with, which, perhaps out of coincidence for us, was also an advantage.
  • Presentation matters, a lot. Our two wonderful front end designers spearheaded the movement to make our web application beautiful. With the help of everyone, beautiful it was. For the actual 60 second demo, we also selected the most energetic and enthusiastic speakers to present. First impressions matter, but when you’re being explicitly judged in comparison to at least 250 other people, and 60 seconds of talking and app visuals is all you’ve got, first impressions really matter.

Hindsight is 20/20, of course. Causally linking our tactics and strategies to our success is fuzzy at best. But learning never stops; whatever happens, success or failure, there is always something to take away and improve yourself, and others, with.

2 thoughts on “How our talented team won $2500 at the TechCrunch Disrupt NYC Hackathon”

  1. What strikes me is how strongly this post echoes the name of your blog. Congrats to you and the whole team!

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