Some books I’m reading, and why

Ever since I got my Kindle 3 years ago, I’ve been reading more. A lot more: before my Kindle, I’d probably average less than one book a year (not including those required for school). For me, it seems that the convenience of reading was a big factor.

Why do I read? As Newton said, to “stand on the shoulder of giants”. So much of mankind’s history, so far, has been recorded in physical writing–not online. Books are still the best way to see into the minds of the greatest scientists, philosophers, leaders, businessmen, etc. of all time.

It’s a balance of course, between actually taking action, and sitting down to spend time learning. The two behaviors are not mutually exclusive: one does learn from taking action, usually skills. Experience–success and especially failure–can teach very important lessons. One can’t meet new people by reading books all the time either. Sometimes though, one can discover brand new ideas and ways of thinking by reading books, ideas that are only talked about in-depth through text, by those in our history who have made a big impact. It is a different way of broadening horizons and gaining perspective.

Onto a few of the favorite books that I am reading, or have read recently, and a short reason why:

  • Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist, Roger Lowenstein
    • The first/original biography on Warren Buffett. Intriguing insight into who he was–and is–as a person, and what characteristics of his personality and events in his life made him so successful, walking the reader from early childhood through the rescue of the Salomon Brothers
  • Mindset, Carol Dweck
    • A book backed by lots of research studies on what the “growth mindset”  is, how it’s so related to success in life, and how to develop it. A good balance of theory and practicality.
  • One World Schoolhouse, Sal Khan
    • Khan, the founder of the successful and impactful Khan Academy, makes convincing arguments for school reform, and talks about his project and how Khan Academy is the start of an educational revolution. He also talks a little bit about his childhood and subsequent path to the founding of Khan Academy. Inspirational and informative.
  • Hooked, Nir Eyal
    • A very practical and impactful book on building habit forming products, products that have fiercely loyal customers who come back to use the product day after day, from someone who has lots of experience doing so. I’ve heard this one recommended a lot by my start-up friends, and it’s one that I often recommend as well, to entrepreneurs looking for a more practical, “business” book.
  • Power of Habit, Charles Duhigg
    • Basically, the science behind Hooked. I believe habits are one of the greatest “force multipliers” in life (definitely a post for another time), and in his book Duhigg presents the science behind them so we can better understand and utilize the power of habits.

You can see I prefer non-fiction, the reason why is pretty utilitarian.